Who is this for?
A non immigrant visa is for anyone who wants to come to the United States for a temporary amount of time, for a limited purpose, or has dual intent to stay indefinitely but needs to get to the United States quickly.

If you have a dual intent; our immigration specialists will get you to the United States quickly, and then we will work on adjusting your status to an immigrant visa while you are in the United States.

Why choose a nonimmigrant visa?
Depending on your reason for travel to the United States, and whether you qualify for a waiver under the Visa Waiver Program  Lords Immigration Specialists and Immigration Consultants will guide you in determining the best visa path for you.  A nonimmigrant visa may grant immediate transfer to the United States to fulfil the purpose of your need to be in the United States.

The following is a brief overview of common nonimmigrant visas please consult one of our certified and bonded immigration specialists for more information or review the Foreign Affairs Manual, 9 FAM 41.12 (http://www.state.gov/m/a/dir/regs/fam/09fam/c22752.htm) for an exhaustive list of nonimmigrant visa categories.

Common Nonimmigrant Visas


A-1. Ambassadors, public ministers, or career diplomats, and their spouses and children.
A-2. Other accredited officials or employees of foreign governments, and their spouses and children.
A-3. Personal attendants, servants, and employees of A-1 and A-2 visa holders, and their spouses and children.
B-1. Business visitors.
B-2. Visitors for pleasure or medical treatment.
C-1. Foreign travelers in immediate and continuous transit through the U.S.
D-1. Crew members who need to land temporarily in the U.S. and who will depart aboard the same ship or plane on which they arrived.
D-2. Crew members who need to land temporarily in the U.S. and who will depart aboard a different ship or plane than the one on which they arrived.
E-1. Treaty traders working for a U.S. trading company that does 50% or more of its business with the trader's home country, and their spouses and children.
E-2. Treaty investors working for a U.S. company with 50% or more of its investment capital coming from the investor's home country, and their spouses and children.
E-3. Australian professionals coming to the United States to perform services in a specialty occupation (similar to an H-1B, but with a separate allotment of 10,500 visas). Spouses and children may accompany the E-3 visa holder.
F-1. Academic or language students.
F-2. Spouses and children of F-1 visa holders.
F-3. Citizens or residents of Mexico or Canada commuting to the U.S. to attend an academic school.
G-1. Designated principal representatives of foreign governments coming to the U.S. to work for an international organization, and their spouses and children.
G-2. Other accredited representatives of foreign governments coming to the U.S. to work for an international organization, and their spouses and children.
G-3. Representatives of foreign governments and their immediate family members who would ordinarily qualify for G-1 or G-2 visas except that their governments are not members of an international organization.
G-4. Officers or employees of international organizations and their spouses and children.
G-5. Attendants, servants, and personal employees of G-1 through G-4 visa holders, and their spouses and children.
H-1B. Persons working in specialty occupations requiring at least a bachelor's degree or its equivalent in on-the-job experience, and distinguished fashion models.
H-1C. Nurses who will work for up to three years in areas of the U.S. where health professionals are recognized as being in short supply.
H-2A. Temporary agricultural workers coming to the U.S. to fill positions for which a temporary shortage of U.S. workers has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
H-2B. Temporary workers of various kinds coming to the U.S. to perform temporary jobs for which there is a shortage of available, qualified U.S. workers.
H-3. Temporary trainees coming for on-the-job training unavailable in their home countries.
H-4. Spouses and children of H-1, H-2, or H-3 visa holders.
I-1. Bona fide representatives of the foreign press coming to the U.S. to work solely in that capacity, and their spouses and children.
J-1. Exchange visitors coming to the U.S. to study, work, or train as part of an exchange program officially recognized by the U.S. Department of State.
J-2. Spouses and children of J-1 visa holders.
K-1. Fiancés or fiancées of U.S. citizens coming to the U.S. for the purpose of getting married.
K-2. Minor, unmarried children of K-1 visa holders.
K-3. Spouses of U.S. citizen petitioners awaiting USCIS approval of their immigrant visa petition and the availability of an immigrant visa, who'd like to enter the U.S. and apply to adjust status, as a supposedly shorter way through the system. (This visa is almost never used, as it tends to actually save no time and cost more.)
K-4. Unmarried children of K-3 visa holders.
L-1. Intracompany transferees who work as managers, executives, or persons with specialized knowledge.
L-2. Spouses and children of L-1 visa holders.
M-1. Vocational or other nonacademic students, other than language students.
M-2. Spouses and children of M-1 visa holders.
M-3. Citizens or residents of Mexico or Canada commuting to the U.S. to attend vocational school.
N-8. Parents of certain special immigrants.
N-9. Children of certain special immigrants or N-9 visa holders.
NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, and NATO-5. Representatives, officials, and experts coming to the U.S. under applicable provisions of the NATO Treaty, and their immediate family members.
NATO-6. Civilians accompanying military forces on missions authorized under the NATO Treaty, and their immediate family members.
NATO-7. Attendants, servants, or personal employees of NATO-1 through NATO-6 visas holders, and their immediate family members.
O-1. Persons of extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics.
O-2. Essential support staff of O-1 visa holders.
O-3. Spouses and children of O-1 and O-2 visa holders.
P-1. Internationally recognized athletes and entertainers, and their essential support staff.
P-2. Entertainers coming to perform in the U.S. through a government-recognized exchange program.
P-3. Artists and entertainers coming to the U.S. in a group to present culturally unique performances.
P-4. Spouses and children of P-1, P-2, and P-3 visa holders.
Q-1. Exchange visitors coming to the U.S. to participate in international cultural exchange programs.
Q-2. (Walsh visas) Participants in the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program
Q-3. Spouses and children of Q-1 visa holders.
R-1. Ministers and other workers of recognized religions.
R-2. Spouses and children of R-1 visa holders.
S-5. People coming to the U.S. to supply information to U.S. authorities about a criminal organization.
S-6. People coming to the U.S. to provide information to U.S. authorities about a terrorist organization.
T-1. Victims of trafficking in persons.
T-2, T-3. Spouses and children of victims of trafficking.
TN. Trade visas for Canadians and Mexicans.
U-1. People who have suffered "substantial physical or mental abuse" as a result of certain U.S. criminal violations including domestic violence and who are assisting law enforcement authorities.
U-2, U-3. Spouses and children of U-1 visa holders.
V. Spouses and children of U.S. lawful permanent resident petitioners who have already waited three years for the approval of their visa petition or for an immigrant visa to become available, so long as their visa petition was submitted on or before December 21, 2000.

Employment Based Temporary Nonimmigrant Visas


Who is eligible for employment based nonimmigrant visas is important in determining if you qualify; please call us for a free consultation today.
E-1 Visa for Treaty Traders in the U.S. for international trade
E-2 Visa for Treaty Investors in the U.S. for countries/business who have already entered into trade treaties with the US.
H-1B Visas for Temporary Specialty Workers
H-2B Visa for Temporary Nonagricultural Workers, especially when there is a shortage of U.S. workers.
L-1, Intracompany Transferee Visa to the U.S. as a manager, executive, or for someone with special knowledge. The overseas company must have an affiliation with a business entity inside the U.S. already.
O-1 Visa to the U.S. to do specialized work; including outstanding work in areas such as sciences, arts, athletics, education or business.
P-1, P-2, or P-3 Visa to the U.S. to bring outstanding athletes, athletic teams, and entertainment companies (including circuses) to the U.S.
R Visa to the U.S. as a Religious Worker, which includes ministers, rabbis, monks, religious instructors, and various other religious leaders or workers.
H-3 Visa to the U.S. as a Temporary Trainee. This is a llimited group of people; primarily for individuals who have been invited to participate in a training program in the United States.
A TN Visa to the U.S. From Mexico or Canada: Mexican and Canadian citizens who practice certain professional occupations set out in NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) and have a job offer from a U.S. employer, TN status offers a simple route to obtain a U.S. nonimmigrant (temporary) work visa.
J-1 Visa to the U.S as a student from abroad coming to the United States for seasonal work such as an au pair.  

 

Important note:

We receive many cases involving needing a visa for a fiance and or spouses. Although the fiancé visa (K-1 nonimmigrant visa) is a quick way to get to the United States to minimize separation you will be required to adjust to an immigrant visa.

For example, If your fiancé is outside of the United States we will file a K-1 nonimmigrant visa to allow your fiancé to enter the United States for 90 days.  The marriage ceremony will need to take place in the 90 days, and then we can have your fiancé on the path to obtaining permanent residency. Even if USCIS takes longer than 90 days, this nonimmigrant visa will be valid and allow your fiancé to remain in the United States while USCIS processes the application. Soon after they will becoming a LPR (legal permanent resident) and be able to enjoy all the great benefits of working, travelling, and creating your life here in the United States.

,Call us today to schedule a consultation to discuss your personal needs if the case is complicated we will refer you to an Immigration Attorney for proper legal advice.